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Pennsylvania Memories: Childhood Playmates

 Mar 04, 2020    0    
We would play baking by making mud pies or sift sand. To sift sand, you needed an old window sc ...
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Guardian Angels

 Mar 01, 2020    0    
In 1989, while asleep, Milton J. Long, LTC AUS RET, received this message from his guardian an ...
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GROWING UP ON THE RAILWAY

 Oct 16, 2019    0    
Growing up on the Railway in the 1920's
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A Family of Florida Sharecroppers

 May 01, 2016    0    
When we moved to Pedro, we lived in a sharecropper's house, and Dad sharecropped for a Florida ...
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Washing Clothes Recipe

 Jan 03, 2007    0    
Washing Clothes Recipe (Given a Young Bride By Her Grandmother)
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Time Moves On

 Jan 01, 2020    0    
We had a Moon Car and my sister used to make Dad so mad because when there was trouble with the ...
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Paul Revere and His Son

 Jul 04, 2019    0    
The sound of his father's words excited Paul Jr. He wanted to help his patriotic father, so he ...
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Legacy of Andrew J. Riley

 Apr 20, 2015    0    
Dad was with the OSS the forerunner of the CIA. We did not really believe him until at his fun ...
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Thelma Wenzel A Life Dedicated to Medical Science

 Mar 02, 2005    0    
a tornado hitting St. Louis in 1896. "It was on Dolman Street," she said. "Mama knew that the t ...
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Julia Flanagan

 Jan 12, 2005    0    
Photo: Julia and Edward Flanagan
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Pearl Harbor Remembered

 Dec 07, 2019    0    
my sister, Mickey McNulty still remembers the news broadcast blaring from the radio on that fat ...
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The Stranger

 Mar 05, 2015    0    
As my father was driving down the highway, he passed a soldier in uniform hitchhiking home to h ...
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Liberation of Stalag VIIA

 Feb 05, 2009    0    
During WWII, I had a personal interest in the Liberation of Stalag VIIA, both times. I had a lo ...
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Excused Boots

 Apr 07, 2005    0    
It was the winter of his discontent. On the first weekend he couldn't wait to get away from the ...
Tuesday 07 December 2004
07 Dec 2004 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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The end for him was near, he could sense it. It was December 1944, in Neiderbroon, France, a time that would later be named the Battle of the Bulge.
Photo of KARL M. WEST, PVT 253 INF 63 DIV
Published by U.S. Legacies Dec 04



Wartime Memories: A Life Cut Short
The Story of Karl Marion West
Written by Leslie Nelson based on interviews with his sister, Hazel, and his own letters to his wife



The winter wind was biting but the soldier did not notice the cold. The pain all that his mind could focus on. The end for him was near, he could sense it. It was December 1944, in Neiderbroon, France, a time that would later be named the Battle of the Bulge. Some 80,000 soldiers lost their lives here. Karl Marion West was one of them.

As he lay there in the snow, his clothes wet and his body rendered immobile by the pain, his eyes tightly closed, his nostrils assaulted by the smell of death. Fear threatened to overcome him, and he struggled to keep control. His years of boxing had taught him to steel himself against the pain, to think in spite of it and yet the pain in the ring was never like this. Then like waking from a nightmare, the pain, the sounds, and the stench stopped.
Wednesday 08 September 2004
08 Sep 2004 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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"I hate rats," Nick would say. Then he would push back his curly hair to show his ear. "One bit me on the ear when I was in the crib. My mother said the rat was as big as a cat."
Photo of Nicolo Anthony Prato


The Watermelon King

By Marie Prato

Nicolo Anthony Prato was born on October 14, 1927, in his grandfather's home in the Bronx. His father, Pasquale, often bragged that within minutes after giving birth, his wife, Agnes, would get out of bed, take the wrapped baby in her arms, and prepare a meal for the family. Philip, their first son, told his mother that he hoped the angels wouldn't take Nick the way they had taken his baby brother, Ralph. Agnes looked at her newest son and commented about the curls that were already forming in the baby's reddish brown hair.
Tuesday 07 September 2004
07 Sep 2004 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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Gas was being rationed. Churchgoers who couldn't afford the fuel to attend regular church held meetings in their homes.
Image of old Chevrolet car dealership

June Brown

By Dale T. Stucky

June Brown, born September 10, 1930, thinks of her life as demarcated into a BC period and an AD period. This seems fitting since she's a strong Christian. BC is "Before Clemmy" whereas AD represents "After Daytona Beach."

She was deposited into the world in Miami, Florida, and spent her earliest childhood in Key West before moving to Daytona Beach at the age of three. These exotic locations suggest a storied upbringing, replete with adventures involving the Everglades, hurricanes, alligators, treasure islands, and the like. But the natural beauty of the settings did nothing to alter a rather grim beginning.
Thursday 12 August 2004
12 Aug 2004 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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Dad only fought in those steamy jungles in that exotic land for about three months before he was shot in the left hand by a .25 caliber Japanese bullet.
Wartime Memories: My Daddy's Heart

Three years after my daddy died, he was issued one of the most prestigious honors a soldier can receive, the Purple Heart. During World War II, my father, Dalton F. Williams, began his military enlistment in a Cavalry unit, but was transferred to the 475th Infantry when the need arose. In the fall of 1944, he was shipped to the Asiatic-Pacific where his company joined forces in Burma with a group of men known as Merrill's Marauders. The new brigade-sized unit was renamed the Mars Task Force.
Monday 02 August 2004
02 Aug 2004 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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Oral tradition in my mother's family is a wealth of names, events and sometimes fantastic stories of ghosts, omens, faith and the deeds of long dead relatives.
Photo of Amanda Arnett Brooks

Amanda Arnett and Richard Brooks During Enslavement

By Joyce Reese McCollum


Our family began with the union of Amanda Arnett and Richard Brooks during enslavement. Each generation has come forward through its era and obstacles. We are well over 200 descendants scattered across the country and diverse in many ways. But we all know the family stories and now, much of the history.

Oral tradition in my mother's family is a wealth of names, events and sometimes fantastic stories of ghosts, omens, faith and the deeds of long dead relatives.

My mother is the seventh of thirteen children. The eldest was born in 1910 and the youngest in 1937! My maternal grandfather was the youngest of his mother, Amanda Arnett Brooks' seven living children. He was born in 1890 and his eldest sister, Jennie in 1862 before Emancipation.

There were many stories about great-grandmother Amanda (born 1846); that she had been a slave and that the slave owner had been her father; that she had a white half-sister who visited her and finally, that she received a government pension that made her affluent for her time and community.

Very little was ever mentioned about her husband, Richard (born 1836). My grandfather was named for him although there were several older brothers. Papa was born in 1890 when Amanda was in her early 50s.

In 1985, the family had gathered for a funeral. All of Mother's surviving siblings were in town. I had recently been given a photograph of great-grandmother Amanda and remarked to my Aunts Ernestine and Hallie that they resembled her a great deal. I asked if they remembered their grandparents. Hallie was born in 1910 and Ernestine in 1912. Both remembered their grandmother very well. Aunt Ernestine said that Amanda had been sewing clothes for Ernestine's upcoming wedding in 1933 and was 98 years old when she died that year.

Neither had any memories of their grandfathers, but recalled when their mother's father died in Dayton, Ohio in 1919. It was their first train ride and first time away from Kentucky.

When questioned as to why he was in Ohio, they replied that he was in the Old Soldiers Home! My brain was racing, Spanish-American War, World War I? The answer floored me! They said that both of their grandfathers had fought in the Blue and Gray War!

The next day I became a genealogist. I called Dayton and found the Old Soldiers Home to be the Veterans Administration Hospital. After a long talk with the archivist, I knew that great-grandfather John Howard had been admitted to the home in 1897 and had died there in January of 1919. He was a veteran of the United States Colored Troops 49th Regiment, Company B. From this information, I applied to NARA and obtained the service and pension files for him and later, great-grandfather Richard Brooks, who served in Company D of the 6th Colored Infantry.

These documents provided much genealogical information for both ancestors.

The file for Richard Brooks included his military enlistment including his year and place of birth, his service record, petitions for his pension, death and burial information and most importantly the "Declaration Of Marriage" affidavit that he and Amanda made at the Henderson County, Kentucky, Court House in 1881, stating that they had cohabited as man and wife since 1858, having been joined under "Old Slave Law" and wished to continue to do so. (I had been told by the county clerk that no marriage record was on file for them.)


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The lady in the hat is Mary Arnett Baldwin. She and Amanda Arnett Brooks (on the right) were supposed to be sisters and remained close all of Amanda's life.


From the NARA file I also obtained the final medical and funeral expenses for Amanda as she did receive a widow's pension after Richard's death in 1905. From her death date, I contacted the local newspaper and obtained a copy of her obituary. From it I learned that, "An Honored Colored Woman Dies."

The obituary told of her being born enslaved on the farm of Elijah Arnett of Cairo, Kentucky and remaining there until freed by the Civil War. There was mention of her being a midwife and having 105 living descendants.

She died in March of 1933. Family tradition also stated that Uncle Fox was the offspring of a white Yankee soldier. Richard Brooks was stationed at Camp Nelson Kentucky from 1864-1866. George was born in 1866. Richard raised him as his own, stating that he knew "Mandy had no say in the matter." It was also family tradition that he could read and write and that Amanda often said, "Pappy never lied in his life!" His application for pension affidavits that give character references state that "Richard Brooks was a moral man, a strict church member and not given to vicious habits."

There are many other family traditions yet to be researched. Next, I may tackle the story of Brother Fox escaping from a chain gang in a flash of fire and never being seen again!

© Joyce Reese McCollum

By Joyce Reese McCollum
Phoenix, AZ
Published by U.S. Legacies: August 2004
Wednesday 23 June 2004
23 Jun 2004 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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During WWII, I couldn't stop the tears when I saw my ship disappear under the water, but just then I felt the shark bump against me. I reached out a hand and tried to push him away.
Wartime Memories: My Island Tour
by E.C.Woodward

Published by U.S. Legacies June 2004

I joined the navy while still in high school in Minnesota. It seemed to me they took too long to call me up so I signed up again. This came back to haunt me later. I was sent to boot camp in Idaho. When I finished there, I was sent to CA to San Pedro to work on the USS Callaghan. She was commissioned on Nov 27, 1943, and attached to the Pacific fleet. We sailed to Hawaii for our shake down cruise.
Wednesday 09 June 2004
09 Jun 2004 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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Before 1910, there was little need for gas stations because owning an automobile was restricted to the wealthy. During this time, motorists were required to visit the local kerosene refinery on the city outskirts, haul a bucket of fuel to their vehicle,


Good Old Days:
Pumping Gas with a Smile
By Sandy Williams Driver


In the high-tech world we live in, driving by a gas station at night can cause momentary blindness if you're not wearing sunglasses. Under those bright lights, you can fill up your tank, buy a gallon of milk, grab a hot sandwich, and wash your car all at one stop, anytime, 24 hours a day and 7 days a week.

Before 1910, there was little need for gas stations because owning an automobile was restricted to the wealthy. During this time, motorists were required to visit the local kerosene refinery on the city outskirts, haul a bucket of fuel to their vehicle, and then use a funnel to pour it into the car's gas tank, which was located under the front seat.
Wednesday 05 May 2004
05 May 2004 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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take a trip back in time, reliving the Civil War, slavery, and post war experiences from the viewpoint of a slave. I truly hope that you find this to be as entertaining and enlightening as I have.

My Life and Travels
By Levi Branham


Submitted by Levi Branhams granddaughter, Lucille Branham

Photo is Levi Branham, at seventy-seven years old, who tells his experiences in his own way.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

I met Miss Lucille, as she is known and loved, at the Dalton, Georgia Senior Center. Every Friday I visit the center to sing, eat, and listen to stories of days gone by and provide my mother with a day out of the house. These visits are the highlights of my week.

It is rare that we have the opportunity to read and experience first-hand accounts of slavery. Here a former slave, Levi Branham, has written his memories for his descendants.

His granddaughter, Miss Lucille Branham has graciously allowed U.S. Legacies to reprint his 64 page memoir for your reading pleasure.
Over the next months you will be able to take a trip back in time, reliving the Civil War, slavery, and post war experiences from the viewpoint of a slave. I truly hope that you find this to be as entertaining and enlightening as I have.

My thanks to Miss Lucille for allowing me, and you, this glimpse into history.
Kathryn Seiley
Tuesday 04 May 2004
04 May 2004 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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My maternal grandmother, Dollie, was a "good woman." In 1921, she married a man with five small children, but didn't know about her ready made family until after the hasty vows were spoken.
Good Ole Days

"A Few Good Women"
By Sandy Williams Driver


Photo of Dalton and Ilene Williams

I recently read Rick Bragg's National Bestseller, "All Over but the Shoutin'," which is the author's recollections of growing up poor in the Deep South. The book evolves around Bragg's mother, Margaret, who went eighteen years without a new dress so that her three sons could have school clothes. In our culture, Mrs. Bragg is what folks would call a "real, good woman" because she repeatedly sacrificed pieces of herself to her children, her husband and her home.
Friday 02 April 2004
02 Apr 2004 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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My maternal grandfather, Ruben Champion Morrow, could "pick the taters off the vine" when he held a banjo across his knee and moved his fingers effortlessly across the five metal strings
Good Ole Days

"Boilin' Cabbage Down"
By: Sandy Williams Driver

Photo of Ruben Champion (R.C.) Morrow holding Banjo.
Other men not known to my family

My maternal grandfather, Ruben Champion Morrow, could "pick the taters off the vine" when he held a banjo across his knee and moved his fingers effortlessly across the five metal strings. As far as I know, he never had any real lessons, but he sure could play a rowdy rendition of "Boilin' Cabbage Down" on his shiny, wooden instrument ordered long ago from the Sears and Roebuck catalog with coins leftover from the cotton crop.
Wednesday 04 February 2004
04 Feb 2004 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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As I recall, it was a Sunday morning when I first got the news on the radio that there was an attack on Pearl Harbor _ I chose my own way to get into the army,
Wartime Memories: Some Of My Army Experiences

Spoken by Stephen Maiden
Transcribed by Melanie Williams


Steve was born in Ohio in 1913. He had three brothers. His mother was a school teacher and his father worked in the steel mines. Steve has lived all over the world, and has many experiences to share.

I was in Baltimore Maryland, and was working in the General office for the Baltimore Railroad. As I recall, it was a Sunday morning when I first got the news on the radio that there was an attack on Pearl Harbor _ I chose my own way to get into the army, and I chose something to do to with transportation since I had a little experience with it.
Tuesday 03 February 2004
03 Feb 2004 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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Grandpa was quite a character and always had plenty of amusing tales to keep me entertained for hours.
Good Ole Days: A Picture Is Worth A Thousand Words
By: Sandy Williams Driver


When I was growing up in north Alabama, I loved to visit my grandparents, Rube and Dollie Morrow. Grandpa was quite a character and always had plenty of amusing tales to keep me entertained for hours. Grandma didn't talk very much but shared her assortment of memories with me through a tattered box of black and white photographs she had collected over the years.
Wednesday 03 December 2003
03 Dec 2003 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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To Merrill's Marauders in Burma during World War II, he was known as a replacement soldier, a member of the "Mars Task Force." To me, he was just Daddy.

The Replacement Soldier: Pfc. Dalton F. Williams
By: Sandy Williams Driver


His Honorable Discharge states his military occupation as a Trooper (Expert: M-1 rifle). To Merrill's Marauders in Burma during World War II, he was known as a replacement soldier, a member of the "Mars Task Force." To me, he was just Daddy.

Dalton Franklin Williams was born in Dekalb County in Alabama on March 9, 1925 to Frank and Dartha Williams. The family owned a small farm and struggled daily with nature to provide food and clothing for their twelve children.
Thursday 27 November 2003
27 Nov 2003 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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Earthy smells filled his nose as he made his way between the trees and through the low underbrush. Black shapes had surrounded him, now they were turning wet.

Thanksgiving: A Tall Tale
By: Michael J. Files


It was cold and dreary in the early pre-dawn as the eleven year old William Shaddox stepped out of his mother's single room shanty. Behind him, he could still hear the quiet noises of sleep made by his older siblings, his mother Mellie, his brother Henry and his two sisters Lilly and Bobbie, still in their warm bed fast asleep. His father he had never known. The man whose name he carried had left when William was still an infant neither hide nor hair had been seen of him since.
Tuesday 04 November 2003
04 Nov 2003 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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Although the U.S. flag was flying above the island, the Japanese were far from relinquishing their territory. The battle continued for another 29 days.
Photo of Bill Simpson

Iwo Jima Remembered
By Stuart Simpson


On Sunday, Dec. 7, 1941, the day Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, 23-year old J.W. "Bill" Simpson wasn't worried about much of anything. His mind was far from the growing world conflict that day as he sat in a car parked off Second Street in Monticello, KY, shooting the bull and drinking moonshine with one of his buddies. An announcement on the radio, however, quickly put all the small talk to rest. Word had just reached the states of Japan's military action. Our country would soon officially join in the war effort, and life for Simpson and hundreds of thousands of other young men and women was about to take a drastic turn.

Beginning on October 24, 1942, Simpson spent three years, six months and six days as a signalman with the amphibious troop transport the U.S.S. Thurston, (AP77). From his post above the bridge, he had an unparalleled view of many of his nation¹s bloodiest and most important battles during the war.

Taking part in the invasions of North Africa, Southern France, Sicily, Normandy, and the assaults on Iwo Jima and Okinawa, the Thurston and her crew earned seven Battle Stars. This is the story of Simpson's view of one of the most memorable moments of the war.

It was at 6 am on February 19, 1945 that the Thurston began landing operations at Iwo Jima. The invasion of the small Pacific island turned out to be one of the bloodiest and most remembered battles of World War II.

For the next eight days, until Feb. 27 when it got underway for Saipan, the ship and her crew took part in the invasion during the day and retired from the area during the night.

Resistance to the Allied troops was fierce. The nearly 22,000 Japanese defending the island were secured in bunkers, which provided strong resistance to the landing. For U.S. troops, advancing 30 or 40 yards on shore during a day was not uncommon.

The advancing soldiers also found that the sands of Iwo Jima were only a myth. The terrain on the volcanic island was all ash - nothing but ash.
"It was no trouble to dig a foxhole," one Marine said. "You could dig it with your hand."

It was on the third day of fighting that Simpson and many other Thurston crewmembers witnessed one of the most symbolic events of World War II, the raising of the U.S. flag on Mount Suribachi.

Suribachi, the highest point on the small island, was near where the Marines had landed. The Thurston held its place just off shore. When the flag was raised and captured in the now-famous photograph, Simpson was at his post near the top of the ship watching. The flag, he says, was raised and lowered a couple of times, apparently for photographers at the ceremony. He later wrote home to his mother that the sight of seeing "our flag" flying atop Mt. Suribachi was one of the most thrilling sights he had ever seen. A sculpture of the flag raising was the basis for the famous sculpture now at the entrance to Arlington National Cemetery.

Although the U.S. flag was flying above the island, the Japanese were far from relinquishing their territory. The battle continued for another 29 days. In the end, it took the Marines 32 days to finally take control of their eight-square-mile objective. The cost of victory, however, was very heavy. The U.S. suffered 25,852 casualties and nearly 7,000 killed. Almost all of the nearly 22,000 Japanese defending the island were killed.

For the Thurston it was on to Saipan, Guam, Talagi, Espiritu and Ulithi before taking part in the final invasion of the war, Okinawa. The ship arrived at the island on April 9 and withstood a Japanese bomber attack for 17 hours. On April 14, the ship began its return to Saipan.

During the spring of 1945, the crew of the Thurston and the rest of the U.S. forces were preparing for one last invasion on the mainland of Japan at Yokohama. After seeing how the Japanese troops had defended their turf on Iwo Jima and Okinawa, most expected the coming landing to be the bloodiest and deadliest yet. However, a new weapon in the U.S. arsenal made the invasion unnecessary, the atomic bomb.


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Today, retired at age 85, Bill Simpson still has vivid memories of his days on the USS Thurston.

When the U.S. dropped its second atomic bomb on Japan and the country surrendered, the Thurston and her crew had just arrived in San Francisco. The ship was in port there from August 14 until August 25, 1945. With the coming of V-J Day, the war was over. All that was left to do was bring our boys home. The Thurston set out for Eniwetock on August 25.

After a return "Magic Carpet" trip to Manila, Guadalcanal, Espiritu Santo and Noumea in New Caledonia, the ship returned to part in Seattle, Washington, arriving Oct. 17. It was here that Simpson took his leave of the Navy and made his way back home.

Returning to Kentucky, Simpson returned to work in the family newspaper, married Eileen Simpson and raised two sons.

Wartime Memories: Iwo Jima Remembered

Iwo Jima Remembered
© Stuart Simpson
Published by U.S. Legacies: November 2003

Bill Simpson
Wednesday 02 October 2002
02 Oct 2002 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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Tourist Rooms and Other Memories back in the twenties, most cars still looked a lot like the carriages they were adapted from.

TOURIST ROOMS
and other memories

by
Reysha Silverhair
Centralia, WA


Carrying his coffee-cup, Hoyt ambled silently around my car. He was attempting to appear very casual, but he was inspecting every detail. Then, peering in through the windows, he said finally, "Well, I don't see any fishing gear. Isn't that one reason you came?"

"Sure is," I replied, "it's all in the trunk."

"Ah. In the trunk; right." Then, coming more quickly around to where he could see me clearly, he pointed at me with his cup. "Bet you don't know why they call it that."

I just stared at him, puzzled. "What? The trunk?" I shook my head. "I dunno; that's just what it's called…isn't it?"
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A Life Cut Short srEDITOR @ (07 Dec 2004) (Wartime Memories)
THE WATERMELON KING srEDITOR @ (08 Sep 2004) (Legacies)
June Brown srEDITOR @ (07 Sep 2004) (Legacies)
My Daddy's Heart...The Purple One srEDITOR @ (12 Aug 2004) (Wartime Memories)
My Island Tour srEDITOR @ (23 Jun 2004) (Wartime Memories)
pumping gas june 04 srEDITOR @ (09 Jun 2004) (Childhood Memories)
My Life and Travels srEDITOR @ (05 May 2004) (Legacies)
A Few Good Women srEDITOR @ (04 May 2004) (Old Lifestyles)
Boilin' Cabbage Down srEDITOR @ (02 Apr 2004) (Old Lifestyles)
Some Of My Army Experiences srEDITOR @ (04 Feb 2004) (Wartime Memories)
A Picture is Worth A Thousand Words srEDITOR @ (03 Feb 2004) (Childhood Memories)
A Tall Thanksgiving Tale srEDITOR @ (27 Nov 2003) (Childhood Memories)
Iwo Jima Remembered srEDITOR @ (04 Nov 2003) (Wartime Memories)
TOURIST ROOMS and Other Memories srEDITOR @ (02 Oct 2002) (Old Lifestyles)
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THE SLINGSHOT

Jan 05, 2006
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pumping gas june 04

Jun 09, 2004
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A Picture is Worth A Thousand Words

Feb 03, 2004
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