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Coon on a Log

 Mar 13, 2020    0    
mountaineer's type relationship with the sport and man's love of his dogs, and more times than ...
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Pennsylvania Memories: Childhood Playmates

 Mar 04, 2020    0    
We would play baking by making mud pies or sift sand. To sift sand, you needed an old window sc ...
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GROWING UP ON THE RAILWAY

 Oct 16, 2019    0    
Growing up on the Railway in the 1920's
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STOUTS MOUNTAIN

 Mar 20, 2019    0    
We all enjoy having relatives visit; it gives us an opportunity to catch up on what's going on ...
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A Family of Florida Sharecroppers

 May 01, 2016    0    
When we moved to Pedro, we lived in a sharecropper's house, and Dad sharecropped for a Florida ...
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Survivor in Our Midst

 Mar 13, 2020    0    
Eva Hamlet's story of survival spans several generations. Even though her beloved husband, Eddi ...
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THE WATERMELON KING

 Mar 11, 2020    0    
"I hate rats," Nick would say. Then he would push back his curly hair to show his ear. "One bit ...
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Time Moves On

 Mar 11, 2020    0    
We had a Moon Car and my sister used to make Dad so mad because when there was trouble with the ...
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Paul Revere and His Son

 Jul 04, 2019    0    
The sound of his father's words excited Paul Jr. He wanted to help his patriotic father, so he ...
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Legacy of Andrew J. Riley

 Apr 20, 2015    0    
Dad was with the OSS the forerunner of the CIA. We did not really believe him until at his fun ...
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Moon Valley Pilea

 Sep 21, 2021    0    
The Plant’s common name, Moon Valley Pilea, is inspired by its deeply dimpled leaves – thought to look like the craters and valleys on the moon.
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Arrowhead Vine

 Feb 12, 2020    0    
This tropical, slow-growing plant works well as either a potted or a hanging plant and generally can survive neglect in its care. It surely brings a bit of greenery to your interior decor without ...
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Operation Varsity

 Mar 12, 2020    0    
Wartime Memories: Operation Varsity
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Civil War Campfires

 Mar 12, 2020    0    
U.S.
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Surveying the Field Nam Nov 04

 Mar 12, 2020    0    
I was assistant communications officer of a non-divisional heavy artillery group (the 52nd), wh ...
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Military Christmas

 Mar 11, 2020    0    
The soldier in this story can honestly say that he only enjoyed two meals during the 2½ years o ...

Gardens and Plants

Tuesday 21 September 2021
21 Sep 2021 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
20210510_Moon_Valley_1.jpg
The Plant’s common name, Moon Valley Pilea, is inspired by its deeply dimpled leaves – thought to look like the craters and valleys on the moon.
Moon Valley Pilea, “Friendship Plants”

The Plant’s common name, Moon Valley Pilea, is inspired by its deeply dimpled leaves – thought to look like the craters and valleys on the moon. The plant itself will remain relatively small. While it doesn’t need much sunlight to thrive, it does prefer humid environments.

Light
These Plants like a moderate to bright light, out of reach from sunlight streaming in through a window.

Soil
Moon Valley likes a rich, well draining potting mix

Water
Allow the top inch to dry before watering your plant. Make sure to let the water drain completely so that it does not build up at the bottom of the plant.  Soggy soil can damage the leaves and cause them to droop.

Humidity
The Moon Valley plant likes a humid environment. The humidity levels should not drop below 50%. They should be kept on a tray filled with moistened pebbles or misted regularly. During the winter, when air is dry, you may consider a humidifier.

Temperature
Keep your Moon Valley in a temperature of 68 to 85 degrees Farenheit. During winters, a moon valley pilea can tolerate temperatures as low as 55°F, but not for long.
Wednesday 12 February 2020
12 Feb 2020 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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This tropical, slow-growing plant works well as either a potted or a hanging plant and generally can survive neglect in its care. It surely brings a bit of greenery to your interior decor without requiring too much maintenance.

Arrowhead Vine



The Arrowhead Vine is one of the plants raised and sold by American Legacies in order to help support this website.

This tropical, slow-growing plant works well as either a potted or a hanging plant and generally can survive neglect in its care. It surely brings a bit of greenery to your interior decor without requiring too much maintenance.

Syngonium podophyllum, commonly called Arrowhead Vine, is an evergreen climbing vine that typically grows to 3-6’ long. As a houseplant, it is typically grown for its attractive ornamental foliage which changes shape as the leaves mature.

Juvenile leaves, up to to 5 1/2” long) are shaped like an egg with heart-shaped bases and sometimes with silver variegation. Leaves mature to an arrow shape. Later leaves become shaped like a foot up to 14” long, each with 5-11 leaflets.

The Arrowhead Vine is an excellent houseplant for low light. It's attractive and easy to grow. Young arrowhead plants are bushy and usually pretty full, making them attractive indoor plant choices for coffee tables, side tables, and other surfaces.
Thursday 06 February 2020
06 Feb 2020 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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This is a story about Marion Hostetter and her love for plants.
This is a story about Marion Hostetter and her love for plants.

I don't know where her love for plants came from, but I have photographs of her as a young girl/woman from back in the early 1900's somewhere close to the Hershey Chocolate Pant or their theme park.

In the background of that photo, are lots of plants, so I don't know if she worked at caring for those plants or if her love for them came later in life, but I do know that as pre-teens, my brother and I would travel around 600 miles "alone" on a train so that we could spend the summer with my grandparents.

I also remember my astonishment at how my grandmother would surround the entire border of her "city" property with plants of all types, plus she had a fish pond that was also surrounded by plants of different types.
 None
Wednesday 08 January 2020
08 Jan 2020 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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Beefsteak Begonia is considered an heirloom species. As an old variety, it doesn’t show up much in large commercial nurseries anymore, partially because the scented, pink flowers are sterile and do not produce seeds.
Begonia Erythrophylla

The Beefsteak Begonia is one of the plants raised and sold by American Legacies in order to help support this website.

Beefsteak Begonia is considered an heirloom species. As an old variety, it doesn’t show up much in large commercial nurseries anymore, partially because the scented, pink flowers are sterile and do not produce seeds.

But fortunately, it’s one of the most commonly passed-down plants from generation to generation.

The following information will assist you in growing your grandmother’s beefsteak begonia quickly in your home.

Beefsteak begonia is a classic begonia species that produces deep red and dark green foliage that looks like a nice steak of beef that’s been aged.

REQUIREMENTS
This vintage plant has special care requirements you need to know to carry on the legacy of this heirloom variety of indoor tropical plants.
Wednesday 04 December 2019
04 Dec 2019 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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The Nerve Plant Superba is an eye-catching houseplant with delicately white veined, deep green leaves.
Nerve Plant – Superba
Fittonia albivenis var. Verschaffeltii

Fittonia albivenis are commonly called by many names, including mosaic-plant, nerveplant, silver fittonia, silver netleaf, silver-nerve and silver-threads and Superba.

The Nerve Plant Superba is an eye-catching houseplant with delicately white veined, deep green leaves. It is a relatively compact, slow-growing plant that grows to a height of 3 to 8 inches with vines 12 to 18 inches long.

The Fittonia Nerve Plant Superba requires high humidity and is sensitive to direct sunlight and prone to suffer leaf burn.

Light
Fittonia Nerve Plant Superba dislikes full sunlight, preferring bright, indirect sun, such as that offered by north-facing windows, behind sheer curtains or in corners away from direct sunlight. It will also thrive under fluorescent lights. If the leaves receive too much direct sunlight, the leaves will begin to shrivel.

Water
Water your Nerve plant when the top layer of soil has just become dry. Moisturize it until water starts to drain out at the bottom of the pot. If the room is warm, you may need to water your plant every other day. Use room temperature water on the plant to avoid shock.

Soil
Fittonia grows well in standard potting soil with a peat-moss base. The soil should retain some moisture but should also drain well. Fittonia nerve plant likes well-drained moist soil, but not too wet.

Temperature
Nerve plant thrives at temperatures around 70 degrees Fahrenheit but will tolerate a range from the low 60s to low 80s.

Humidity
The Nerve Plant Superba needs to be kept constantly moist. Regular misting once or twice a day or using a pebble pan with water will help keep the plants from drying out. Using a humidifier, especially during the wintertime may be a good choice.

Feed

During its growing season, feed the Nerve Plant weekly with a weak dose of liquid fertilizer formulated for tropical plants. A balanced 5-5-5 fertilizer diluted to half strength is a good formulation.

Prune
To have full and bushy foliage, pinch off the ends of growing stems. This will prevent the plant from getting leggy. Pinching off the insignificant flowers also helps to keep the Nerve Plant foliage full.

Repotting
Your Nerve Plant will also benefit from repotting every one or two years. Replacing the soil, trimming back roots (if you desire to keep the plant compact), or repotting them in a larger container all help your fittonia to grow well.
Sunday 01 December 2019
01 Dec 2019 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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The Philodendron cordatum, or heart leafed philodendron, is a trailing plant that trail and grow long. It pairs well with a hanging planter, or can be placed on a table or shelf. This fast-growing trailing beauty is also known as the Sweetheart Plant
Philodendron plants are tropical flowering plants in the family Araceae. Many of the 480 species of Philodendron plants are popular houseplants thanks to their large, green leaves.

The Philodendron cordatum, or heart leafed philodendron, is a trailing plant that trail and grow long. It pairs well with a hanging planter, or can be placed on a table or shelf.

This fast-growing trailing beauty is also known as the Sweetheart Plant because its leaves are shaped like beautiful hearts and is often given for anniversary gifts due to its association with romance.

These plants are easy to care for and are a must-have for a tall shelf or spot where you wish the plant to trail down beautifully. They like a spot with good indirect lighting!

The leaves are often bronze-colored when they first emerge then turn to dark green as they mature. On rare occasions, a mature plant might produce small greenish white flowers.

This plant's tendency to grow very long stems (four feet or longer) makes it one of the few "climbing" house plants.

Light

This plant does best in bright, indirect light so choose an indoor location that does not receive direct sunlight. Too much direct sunlight will scorch its leaves.

Water
Water whenever the top 1” of soil is dry. Never use cold water because it can harm your plants by shocking its root system too suddenly. Also be careful not to over water your Philodendron. If the leaves turn yellow, that's could be a sign of over watering. Let the soil dry out to the touch between watering.

Temperature and Humidity
The heartleaf philodendron, tolerates dry air but prefers a humidity around 40%. Higher humidity levels can cause problems, leading to fungus on the leaves.

Note: If your heartleaf philodendron has a tendency to develop fungus, be careful to dry off leaves after watering and let the soil dry out between watering. This plant is also sensitive to extreme heat so be sure to keep it away from heat sources and direct sunlight.

Fertilizer
You can apply a diluted fertilizer solution once or twice during the active growth season in spring and summer. Do not feed during the winter.

Pruning
Pruning promotes growth. Cutting back long stems keeps this plant looking neat, bushy, and full. Cut the stem just after a leaf node (the place where a leaf is attached to the stem). A new stem will grow from that node. Also, remove any leaves with spots or signs of bruising or fungus.

Tip: Prune close to a node because any bare stems will die, and the node will not grow a new stem.


Potting and Repotting
You should repot your heartleaf philodendron every two to three years. Repotting can help prevent root rot and keep the plant's root system healthy. Gently loosen the potting soil around the root system and add new potting soil to the new container. Water the plant lightly after settling it into its new pot.

Soil
Use a good soilless potting mix with plenty of peat moss, perliteand and slow-release fertilizer. You can make your own potting mix with peat moss, perlite, vermiculite, and used coffee grounds.

Common Pests and Diseases
In addition to occasional problems with fungus on leaves, this plant can be somewhat susceptible to fungus gnats. These tiny insects can be seen crawling around on top of the potting medium. Tiny aphids might also be a problem; they tend to appear near the fresh growth of new leaf nodes.
Tuesday 09 October 2018
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The Wandering Jew Stripe Plant is a vine type fast growing plant with deep purple and green leaves containing beautiful striping down the center of the leaf that likes warmth, bright indirect lighting and humidity.

Wandering Jew Inch or Stripe


The Wandering Jew Stripe Plant is a vine type fast growing plant with deep purple and green leaves containing beautiful striping down the center of the leaf that likes warmth, bright indirect lighting and humidity. They can be pinched back to encourage fullness.

Light
The Wandering Jew does best in bright, indirect sunlight. If it doesn’t get enough light, the plant can become leggy and the purple ribbon will fade.

Water
The Wandering Jew, Zebrina, likes moist soil. Water after the top inch of potting soil is dry.


Soil

Any good potting soil will do for your Wandering Jew. For instance, this could be Miracle gro potting soil that is readily available.

Temperature
Wandering Jews are able to thrive with average room temperatures, 65 to 80°F. Try and avoid conditions below 55F (13C) if at all possible.

Humidity
Wandering Jew Zebrina likes a good deal of humidity. Mist regularly (or set on a pebble tray)

Repotting
If you notice The Zabrina’s roots blocking the drainage hole then you should consider repotting it. Tradescantia zebrina is best repotted during spring as this is when it is growing most actively.

Pests
To deter/reduce fungus gnats remove dead leaves and let the top layer of potting mix dry out between waterings. 

The Wandering Jew is not particularly susceptible to plant diseases or pests. Yet, at some point, you might have to deal with an aphids attack. These parasites pierce the leaves of their host plant and suck their sap.

Aphids attack in warm, dry environments. One way to prevent this is to ensure regular watering and occasional misting of your Wandering Jew.

If your plant does get Aphids, first, isolate the plant from other plants, then the best combat is rinsing the plant with water.
Monday 03 September 2018
03 Sep 2018 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
Dragon_tree_2.jpg
Due to its low maintenance, the Dragon Plant is suitable not only for offices but also for the homes of beginner gardeners. The plant has an exotic aesthetic that looks great in a modern, contemporary, or a Zen interior design. Moreover, its great air-pur
Madagascar Dragon Tree (Dracaena Marginata)

The Madagascar Dragon Tree is characterized by long, narrow leaves that are extremely spiky.
It’s actually closely related to lilies!

Light: Dragon Tree plants prefer bright, indirect light, but they can tolerate low light. Lower light levels will slow down this plant’s growth to its maximum height of 6 feet, so a slower growth rate isn’t necessarily a bad thing if you don’t have a lot of space.

Water: Keep the soil moist, but never let it get soggy. The Dragon Tree can survive with irregular watering.  Ideally, you should water the plant once a week in the summertime, and once every two or three weeks in the winter. Decrease the watering frequency gradually as the season changes.

Temperature: Ideal temperatures are between 65°- 80°F, no less than 50.

Humidity:
Normal household humidity is fine and misting the leaves is advised. They do like fresh air during the summer from an open window, and do not like stuffy hot rooms from central heating systems.

Fertilizer:
They don’t need much fertilizer, but if you do want to fertilize, do it once a month in the growth season (spring, summer) with a standard houseplant fertilizer at 50% strength.

Due to its low maintenance, the Dragon Plant is suitable not only for offices but also for the homes of beginner gardeners. The plant has an exotic aesthetic that looks great in a modern, contemporary, or a Zen interior design. Moreover, its great air-purifying properties make it ideal for any city home.
Wednesday 02 May 2018
02 May 2018 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
Tradescantia_pallida_Wandering_Jew.jpg
The Purple Heart Wandering Jew is known for it’s vibrant purple foliage. An added bonus is the unique beautiful blooms that range from violet to pink. The plant blooms with small clusters throughout the warm season.

Purple Heart Wandering Jew


Tradescantia Pallida, the Purple Heart Wandering Jew or Purple Queen Wandering Jew

The Purple Heart Wandering Jew is known for it’s vibrant purple foliage. An added bonus is the unique beautiful blooms that range from violet to pink. The plant blooms with small clusters throughout the warm season.

Plant in a small decorative container for an eye-catching table accent or hang it in a basket and let the long, sprawling stems cascade over the side.

The Purple Heart Wandering Jew is considered to have a fairly fast rate of growth, especially when compared to other indoor plants.

Light
Grow your plant in bright light year-round for good foliage color. It will grow in lower light, but the leaves will be more green than purple. Give it some direct sun, but shade it from hot, noonday sun in summer to avoid scorching its leaves.

Soil
Purple heart plants will grow best in soil that's lightweight, porous, and moist. Ideally the soil should contain peat moss, Perlite and compost.

Water
Water the plant when the top layer of soil feels dry to the touch.

Temperature
The Purple Heart Wandering Jew can handle many temperature ranges, but is susceptible to frost. Humidity around 40 to 50 percent creates an ideal growing condition for the plant.

Fertilizer
The purple heart plant usually doesn’t require fertilizer. If you do use fertilizer, be sure to dilute the solution to about half its usual strength.

Repotting
The purple Heart Wandering Jew won't require frequent repotting but it will need to be transferred to a new container if the roots begin to push through the drainage holes located on the underside of the pot. This will typically occur during spring due to its tendency to spread out during the growing season.
Thursday 01 March 2018
01 Mar 2018 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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Rubber tree plants don't like abrupt changes. Always allow your plant to acclimate gradually to new locations or conditions. Push it too fast, and your rubber tree plant may drop its leaves.
Rubber Tree


Rubber tree plants don't like abrupt changes. Always allow your plant to acclimate gradually to new locations or conditions. Push it too fast, and your rubber tree plant may drop its leaves.

Light - Rubber plants do best with bright, indirect sunlight, such as an east-facing window.

Water
– Rubber Trees like to be kept steadily moist but not soaked. Rubber plants also are vulnerable to excessive dryness and don't tolerate drought well

Soil – Rubber plants prefer well-draining soil with good aeration. Allow the soil to dry slightly, then water thoroughly. Never let your plant dry out to the point of wilted, drooping leaves. Rubber trees need less water during winter months, so reduce watering accordingly.

Temperature - Rubber trees are best kept in moderate to warm temperatures between 60 degrees Fahrenheit and 75 degrees Fahrenheit.

Humidity – Rubber trees like moderate – medium – humidity.

Fertilizer – Use a weak fertilizer (half- strength houseplant fertilizer – during the spring and early summer.

It's natural for rubber plants to occasionally have an older, lower leaf turn yellow and fall off, but widespread yellowing or dropping leaves signal bigger problems. Overwatering is the most common problem faced by rubber trees.

As the rubber plant grows it will begin to droop, so it's important that you help support them by using a long wooden dowel (or bamboo stalk) to help keep them upright.
Tuesday 18 July 2017
18 Jul 2017 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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The Peperomia plant is a smart choice for beginner houseplant enthusiasts. Not only are they forgiving plants that tolerate some benign neglect,

Peperomia


The Peperomia plant is a smart choice for beginner houseplant enthusiasts. Not only are they forgiving plants that tolerate some benign neglect, but the spectacular variety of colors and textures available within the species means that you can amass an interesting collection of plants for every style and space, all of which require the same care.

Plant peperomia in a pot with ample drainage holes, using an orchid potting mix, then place the plant in bright indirect light.
Peperomia plants require little in the way of attention. You only need to water them when the soil is dry. Plant food or fertilizer is rarely necessary.
They will grow 6-12 inches tall and 6 to 12 inches wide and are slow-growing plants that can be planted all year long. They are susceptible to rot if the soil is consistently too moist.

Discolored or dropping leaves are usually a sign of inadequate light or excessive watering, not poor nutrition.

Light
Peperomia plants need medium to bright light to maintain their vibrant foliage colors. Morning light and filtered light is fine, as well as 12 to 16 hours of artificial light.
Insufficient light will result in fewer leaves, leaf drop, and drab coloration. Direct sun rays should be avoided, as it can burn the leaves

Water
The succulent leaves of peperomia plants indicate that the plants don't need frequent watering to maintain vigor. Allow the surface of the soil to dry out between waterings. Keeping the Peperomia on the dry side is better than saturating it, which leads to root rot
Temperature and Humidity
Peperomia plants are hardy to USDA zone 10, which means they cannot be exposed to temperatures less than 30 degrees Fahrenheit.

As tropical plants, they prefer a warm and steamy environment, especially in the summer months. If you keep your plant inside year round, you can place it on a tray of pebbles and water.

Fertilizer

Peperomia can go its entire life without supplemental fertilizer, getting what it needs from its planting media.

Pruning
Lightly prune peperomia plants in the early spring to correct any leggy, sparse growth. Pinching back the stems will help maximize the plant's lush appearance by encouraging more branching. Remove the end of each stem and the first set of leaves; you can pinch them off with your fingers or snip them off with hand pruners.

Repotting Peperomia Plants
Peperomia plants can live for years in a small pot. They enjoy being root-bound but when it comes time to repot them, use a soil mix that will allow for good drainage.

Common Pests
Peperomia plants are subject to common houseplant pests such as mealybugs, spider mites, and whiteflies. Insecticidal soap is the easiest treatment for these pests.

Problems To Watch For


Leaves Curling
Leaves Turning Yellow
Leaves Falling Off
Mushy or rotting roots
Moldy Soil


Remedy: Cut back on water or repot your plant using rocks in the base of the pot to increase drainage and also use a catch basin under the pot that will catch the water, without letting it soak back into the pot. You can also use rocks in the basin under the pot, to separate the pot and roots from the excessive water.

Burnt Leaves:
Remedy: Move OUT of Direct Sun and place in filtered light.

Droopy Leaves:
Leaves Falling Off:
Remedy: Move to an area that offers brighter light that is filtered

Wilting
Remedy: Your plant could be root bound and the roots need more oxygen. Repot the plant and use more gravel into the potting soil.
Wednesday 08 July 2015
08 Jul 2015 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
20210415_Hoya_Bloom2a.jpg
If you're looking for an exotic indoor plant that's very easy to grow, take a look at the Hoya (also sometimes called a Hindu Rope or Wax Plant). This unique houseplant is a vine that has thick, waxy leaves and beauriful flowers.

HOYA


If you're looking for an exotic indoor plant that's very easy to grow, take a look at the Hoya (also sometimes called a Hindu Rope or Wax Plant). This unique houseplant is a vine (but don't worry; it's not a fast-growing one!) that has thick, waxy leaves and beautiful flowers.

It's among the most tolerant of all houseplants.

Hoya is often sold in hanging baskets, but its lanky stems will trail from tall containers such as urns, too. Or, if you want to grow it upright, supply a trellis or totem and let hoya supply vertical interest to your home or office.

Light:
A north window is the best location. You can grow your Hoya in low, medium, or bright light because it tolerates low and medium light, but doesn't typically bloom in these conditions. Like most flowering houseplants, the more light a Hoya gets, the more flowers it will produce.

Water:
Water Hoya when the potting mix dries out. Don't worry if you forget to water it once or twice because the thick leaves and stems help the plant store water. Hoyas also have the ability to pull moisture out of the air and use it to maintain their well-being.

You can also mist the leaves to clean them and increase humidity, but NOT when the plant is budding or has flowers blooming.

Make sure you do not overwater it because the Hoya would rather be too dry than too wet and can suffer from root rot if the potting mix stays wet for extended periods. 

The plants go semi-dormant in winter so reduce the water in winter.

Temperature:
Keep them a minimum of 50 degrees Fahrenheit

Fertilizer:
Your Hoya doesn't require a lot of fertilizer, but you can fertilize it if you want it to bloom better. Use any general-purpose houseplant fertilizer and follow the directions on the packaging.

Soil:
Well draining soil is the best, in order to protect the plant from root rot, so be sure to use plenty of Perlite in your potting mix.

Also, never let your plant sit in a saucer that has water standing in it, as that will cause root rot.

Humidity:
Hoyas love humidity, so either use a humidifier or spray the leaves frequently or you can place a tray filled with rocks under the plant, but just make sure none of the water can get seep into the bottom of the pot and cause root rot.

General Tips:
When your Hoya is done blooming, if you leave the stalk on the plant, it may produce new flowers. On the other hand, if you remove the stalk, it will force the plant to produce a new stalk and delays blooming.

If you keep your Hoya root bound, it will bloom heavier then plants that are in a larger pot.

Be sure to give your Hoya plenty of room from other plants, so they can get lots of air. This will help prevent a fungus from growing, due to the high humidity.

While Hoyas need lots of light, too much direct sun can cause the leaves to fade and yellow, so be sure to keep the Hoyas away from direct sun and use diffused or indirect lighting.


Note: Hoya is not meant for human or animal consumption. 
Monday 03 May 2010
03 May 2010 Posted by srEDITOR Comments: 0 Views: 
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The Angel Wing Begonia is also known as a “Cane Begonia” and “Begonia x Coralline.” It is named for the shape of it’s leaves and is one of the easiest begonias to grow inside your home. They can be used as a dwarf plant or a 5’ tall floor shrub.

The My Special Angel Wing Begonia is one of the plants raised and sold by American Legacies in order to help support this website.

The My Special Angel Wing Begonia is also known as a “Cane Begonia” and “Begonia x Coralline.” It is named for the shape of it’s leaves and is one of the easiest begonias to grow inside your home. They can be used as a dwarf plant or a 5’ tall floor shrub, depending on how you grow it.

This plant can provide you with year round attractive foliage, displaying speckled or streaked foliage on green leaves that have a red backside. It also has a pink, red, white or orange flowers.

WATER
The Angel Wing Begonia likes moist but not soggy soil, so you should allow it to dry between watering it. We typically water it once a week, depending on the season and amount of light.

LIGHT
These plants prefer bright indirect light, if you want it to flower year round. However, if you don’t have a good spot with bright light available, (not in direct sun), or you prefer to keep it just for the decorative foliage instead of the flowers, you can move it to a low light area, where it will still maintain it’s growth and attractive foliage.

SOIL
Use a soil that is high in organic material.
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Biddin' High (Playing Cards)

Mar 12, 2020
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Thanksgiving Bird Nov 04

Mar 12, 2020
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Schooltime Memories Oct 04

Jan 08, 2020
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